Didn't Get Paid Commissions? Texas Has A Statute For That!

Jon Michael Smith, Board-Certified And AV Preeminent Rated Attorney · Call 512-518-4584

Businesses often treat independent sales reps and contractors as the last bill to be paid at the end of the month. Too often, contractors are expected to meet tight deadlines and quality demands, but must struggle to get paid on time. The good news is that Texas has a law against cheating contractors out of their fair pay.

Win Three Times The Amount Of Money You Are Owed For Unpaid Commissions

By Texas labor law statute, you may be able to treble (triple) the amount of money you are owed if the courts determine that the business has deliberately withheld your commissions or reduced the amount of money you are owed. If you are an independent contractor or sales representative in Central Texas, I can help. Call my office in Austin to arrange a free confidential consultation.

What Does It Mean To Be A Texas Board-Certified And AV Preeminent Rated* Lawyer?

Earning board certification from the Texas Board of Legal Specialization means I am a specialist in the area of consumer and commercial law. It also means the Texas Bar has placed the highest confidence in my abilities and knowledge in my area of specialty. I have also earned the highest AV Preeminent rating among my legal peers for offering the highest level of knowledge, service and integrity.

You deserve to be paid the commissions you have earned. Call my office at 512-518-4584 to discuss your case. I handle many commission litigation cases on a contingency fee basis. There will be no upfront retainer or case preparation fees. I get paid a percentage of the money you are awarded in a settlement or jury award, if your case goes to trial.

*AV Preeminent and BV Distinguished are certification marks of Reed Elsevier Properties Inc., used in accordance with the Martindale-Hubbell certification procedures, standards and policies. Martindale-Hubbell is the facilitator of a peer review rating process. Ratings reflect the confidential opinions of members of the bar and the judiciary. Martindale-Hubbell ratings fall into two categories: legal ability and general ethical standards.